TW: racism (how many of these do you experience)

  • You may be affected by:

    • racism directed towards your family and loved ones
    • constant negative headlines about a group you identify with or a country you have ties with
    • misrepresentation or no representation in the media
    • noticing worrying patterns of behaviour from the institutions you interact with (whether at your doctor’s surgery, at school, at work)
    • reading statistics that show unfairness and inequality across the justice, health and education system
    • people dismissing how we feel, telling us we’re overreacting, or denying there is a problem

    You avoid:

    • speaking in another language, or with an accent, in public
    • using public transport or going to certain public places alone where you could be a minority
    • using your real name on a job application
    • worrying about interacting with the police
    • worrying about wearing the clothes we want to wear
    • hiding parts of our identity, like our religion or culture
    • sharing our worldview and taking part in topical discussions
    • visiting places, or going on holiday to places, where racism has been reported


    Please go into detail if you want to, I'm really interested in each person's experiences with these things

    Some of them aren't out right racism but I'm still curious

  • You may be affected by:

    • racism directed towards your family and loved ones
    • constant negative headlines about a group you identify with or a country you have ties with
    • misrepresentation or no representation in the media
    • noticing worrying patterns of behaviour from the institutions you interact with (whether at your doctor’s surgery, at school, at work)
    • reading statistics that show unfairness and inequality across the justice, health and education system
    • people dismissing how we feel, telling us we’re overreacting, or denying there is a problem

    You avoid:

    • speaking in another language, or with an accent, in public
    • using public transport or going to certain public places alone where you could be a minority
    • using your real name on a job application
    • worrying about interacting with the police
    • worrying about wearing the clothes we want to wear
    • hiding parts of our identity, like our religion or culture
    • sharing our worldview and taking part in topical discussions
    • visiting places, or going on holiday to places, where racism has been reported


    Please go into detail if you want to, I'm really interested in each person's experiences with these things

    Some of them aren't out right racism but I'm still curious

    well as you are aware I was bullied as a kid because i was Chinese and the only Asian at an otherwise Caucasian school so there was that racism but as one grows order they seems to be less of it in public or work or otherwise as Australia is a pretty multicultural country


    (PS: I'm only speaking for myself and my own experiences...)

  • well as you are aware I was bullied as a kid because i was Chinese and the only Asian at an otherwise Caucasian school so there was that racism but as one grows order they seems to be less of it in public or work or otherwise as Australia is a pretty multicultural country


    (PS: I'm only speaking for myself and my own experiences...)

    The first part is basically the same for me only reverse it, only white person in an all Asian place

    As I've grown up I've learned to ignore it but I still avoid things when in public

  • You may be affected by:

    • racism directed towards your family and loved ones
    • constant negative headlines about a group you identify with or a country you have ties with
    • misrepresentation or no representation in the media
    • noticing worrying patterns of behaviour from the institutions you interact with (whether at your doctor’s surgery, at school, at work)
    • reading statistics that show unfairness and inequality across the justice, health and education system
    • people dismissing how we feel, telling us we’re overreacting, or denying there is a problem

    You avoid:

    • speaking in another language, or with an accent, in public
    • using public transport or going to certain public places alone where you could be a minority
    • using your real name on a job application
    • worrying about interacting with the police
    • worrying about wearing the clothes we want to wear
    • hiding parts of our identity, like our religion or culture
    • sharing our worldview and taking part in topical discussions
    • visiting places, or going on holiday to places, where racism has been reported


    Please go into detail if you want to, I'm really interested in each person's experiences with these things

    Some of them aren't out right racism but I'm still curious

    1. When I was in 3rd grade I was bullied for my "Indian" accent. At that time I just came to the U.S. The sad part was that most of the people that bullied me for it were Indians. Eventually I lost the accent.


    2. To this day I am still shy about wearing Indian related stuff because I fear I might be humiliated. In third grade, I used to wear this thing on my forehead(it is a Indian thing).

    Black Dot Bindi | Chohans Online

    And people made fun of it and said it was weird. From then on I stopped wearing it unless I am in India or in a Indian related enviroment.

  • You may be affected by:

    • constant negative headlines about a group you identify with or a country you have ties with (usually white people are.... not appreciated by media)
    • misrepresentation or no representation in the media (the only time I see someone of my race is when 'white man kills civilian' notice how 'white' and 'man' were specified and nothing was for the victim. In korea, they keep victims and criminals very secret and out of the public eye but usually if it's a white person, they make sure to specify that)
    • reading statistics that show unfairness and inequality across the justice, health and education system (there are lots of statistics showing racism towards white and black people here)
    • people dismissing how we feel, telling us we’re overreacting, or denying there is a problem (#1 problem: 'white privilege'. People always say white people can't experience racism.... that is false. When you say anything about your racism experience as a white person, people are quick to shut you down, even though we are all humans)

    You avoid:

    • speaking in another language, or with an accent, in public (I will speak English in public but I really try to exaggerate my Korean accent in public. I still have a pretty American accent when speaking korean but it's because I don't really try hard to sound korean)
    • using public transport or going to certain public places alone where you could be a minority (it's dangerous to travel alone as a white women. White girls are usually pro*titutes in Korea)
    • using your real name on a job application (I don't have an Asian name, although I'm thinking of changing my name so I can get better jobs. But some jobs make you give them a picture and they see I'm not Asian and there goes that job)
    • worrying about interacting with the police (as I said, white females are known for being pr*stitues, I don't know why, so when police see me they check up on me, even if I'm dressed well and not looking skimpy. Pr*stitution is illegal btw)
    • worrying about wearing the clothes we want to wear (The risk of getting stopped by police is higher the more comfy your clothes are)
    • sharing our worldview and taking part in topical discussions (people have told me 'you're american so you wouldn't understand how us koreans feel about this'. Which, I'm a Korean citizen now, I have lived here for almost a decade, I grew up here, I went to school here, and people still tell me I don't understand, even though from 15 years old I have grown up Korean)

    Just interesting things to talk about

  • such as ?

    You may be affected by:

    • constant negative headlines about a group you identify with or a country you have ties with (usually white people are.... not appreciated by media)
    • misrepresentation or no representation in the media (the only time I see someone of my race is when 'white man kills civilian' notice how 'white' and 'man' were specified and nothing was for the victim. In korea, they keep victims and criminals very secret and out of the public eye but usually if it's a white person, they make sure to specify that)
    • reading statistics that show unfairness and inequality across the justice, health and education system (there are lots of statistics showing racism towards white and black people here)
    • people dismissing how we feel, telling us we’re overreacting, or denying there is a problem (#1 problem: 'white privilege'. People always say white people can't experience racism.... that is false. When you say anything about your racism experience as a white person, people are quick to shut you down, even though we are all humans)

    You avoid:

    • speaking in another language, or with an accent, in public (I will speak English in public but I really try to exaggerate my Korean accent in public. I still have a pretty American accent when speaking korean but it's because I don't really try hard to sound korean)
    • using public transport or going to certain public places alone where you could be a minority (it's dangerous to travel alone as a white women. White girls are usually pro*titutes in Korea)
    • using your real name on a job application (I don't have an Asian name, although I'm thinking of changing my name so I can get better jobs. But some jobs make you give them a picture and they see I'm not Asian and there goes that job)
    • worrying about interacting with the police (as I said, white females are known for being pr*stitues, I don't know why, so when police see me they check up on me, even if I'm dressed well and not looking skimpy. Pr*stitution is illegal btw)
    • worrying about wearing the clothes we want to wear (The risk of getting stopped by police is higher the more comfy your clothes are)
    • sharing our worldview and taking part in topical discussions (people have told me 'you're american so you wouldn't understand how us koreans feel about this'. Which, I'm a Korean citizen now, I have lived here for almost a decade, I grew up here, I went to school here, and people still tell me I don't understand, even though from 15 years old I have grown up Korean)
  • 1. When I was in 3rd grade I was bullied for my "Indian" accent. At that time I just came to the U.S. The sad part was that most of the people that bullied me for it were Indians. Eventually I lost the accent.


    2. To this day I am still shy about wearing Indian related stuff because I fear I might be humiliated. In third grade, I used to wear this thing on my forehead(it is a Indian thing).

    Black Dot Bindi | Chohans Online

    And people made fun of it and said it was weird. From then on I stopped wearing it unless I am in India or in a Indian related enviroment.

    I'm sorry that happened, people suck sometimes

    Also, I think the bindi is pretty

  • You may be affected by:

    • constant negative headlines about a group you identify with or a country you have ties with (usually white people are.... not appreciated by media)
    • misrepresentation or no representation in the media (the only time I see someone of my race is when 'white man kills civilian' notice how 'white' and 'man' were specified and nothing was for the victim. In korea, they keep victims and criminals very secret and out of the public eye but usually if it's a white person, they make sure to specify that)
    • reading statistics that show unfairness and inequality across the justice, health and education system (there are lots of statistics showing racism towards white and black people here)
    • people dismissing how we feel, telling us we’re overreacting, or denying there is a problem (#1 problem: 'white privilege'. People always say white people can't experience racism.... that is false. When you say anything about your racism experience as a white person, people are quick to shut you down, even though we are all humans)

    You avoid:

    • speaking in another language, or with an accent, in public (I will speak English in public but I really try to exaggerate my Korean accent in public. I still have a pretty American accent when speaking korean but it's because I don't really try hard to sound korean)
    • using public transport or going to certain public places alone where you could be a minority (it's dangerous to travel alone as a white women. White girls are usually pro*titutes in Korea)
    • using your real name on a job application (I don't have an Asian name, although I'm thinking of changing my name so I can get better jobs. But some jobs make you give them a picture and they see I'm not Asian and there goes that job)
    • worrying about interacting with the police (as I said, white females are known for being pr*stitues, I don't know why, so when police see me they check up on me, even if I'm dressed well and not looking skimpy. Pr*stitution is illegal btw)
    • worrying about wearing the clothes we want to wear (The risk of getting stopped by police is higher the more comfy your clothes are)
    • sharing our worldview and taking part in topical discussions (people have told me 'you're american so you wouldn't understand how us koreans feel about this'. Which, I'm a Korean citizen now, I have lived here for almost a decade, I grew up here, I went to school here, and people still tell me I don't understand, even though from 15 years old I have grown up Korean)

    sorry the part that stood out to me was white girls are known for being hookers????

    really? is that a big thing in Korea? lol


    I complete empathize with your situation my friend and although i cannot say that i've experienced that when i became an adult i can certainly understand how you much be feeling sometimes...

  • sorry the part that stood out to me was white girls are known for being hookers????

    really? is that a big thing in Korea? lol


    I complete empathize with your situation my friend and although i cannot say that i've experienced that when i became an adult i can certainly understand how you much be feeling sometimes...

    It's not really a big thing people point out a lot since that industry isn't big in Korea, and there are definitely Korean ones too, but yeah. It's because it's easy to do, and 1 out of 25 guys is a frequent customer. Some girls get paid to do films and stuff. Some companies lure girls to SK by high salaries then make them do that..... it's a rough subject but yeah, many people think most white girls are there because they are hookers

  • It's not really a big thing people point out a lot since that industry isn't big in Korea, and there are definitely Korean ones too, but yeah. It's because it's easy to do, and 1 out of 25 guys is a frequent customer. Some girls get paid to do films and stuff. Some companies lure girls to SK by high salaries then make them do that..... it's a rough subject but yeah, many people think most white girls are there because they are hookers

    wow...I wonder if any dodgy entertainment companies have been like...


    come be a kpop idol then try to force them to be prostitutes...

  • wow...I wonder if any dodgy entertainment companies have been like...


    come be a kpop idol then try to force them to be prostitutes...

    Well..... we do know that some trainees get 'sponsors' and have to give them 'special favors' so they will put in a good word about them and they may have a better chance at debuting

    The sponsors are usually executives or stockholders in the company...... it's creepy to think about

  • Well..... we do know that some trainees get 'sponsors' and have to give them 'special favors' so they will put in a good word about them and they may have a better chance at debuting

    The sponsors are usually executives or stockholders in the company...... it's creepy to think about

    yeah I read about that ... i can't speak for the korean entertainment industry but a lot of that stuff happens in the Chinese entertainment industry...where to get ahead execs and other rich/powerful people would coerce or force them into such things...sometimes the girls would do it willingly so get a leg up as well

  • yeah I read about that ... i can't speak for the korean entertainment industry but a lot of that stuff happens in the Chinese entertainment industry...where to get ahead execs and other rich/powerful people would coerce or force them into such things...sometimes the girls would do it willingly so get a leg up as well

    Yeah, I'm sure it happens everywhere in some way or another

  • You may be affected by:

    • racism directed towards your family and loved ones
      • Yes, my parents often get made of or get harassed for their accent
    • constant negative headlines about a group you identify with or a country you have ties with
      • Thanks to 90 day fiance, the increase of "Filipino women wanting green cards" stereotype is out of control
    • misrepresentation or no representation in the media
      • looool truuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuth
    • noticing worrying patterns of behaviour from the institutions you interact with (whether at your doctor’s surgery, at school, at work)
      • When I was in school I always ate the school lunch because if I packed filipino food, the kids would say it's "dog" or that it stinks
    • reading statistics that show unfairness and inequality across the justice, health and education system
      • Model Minority Myth
    • people dismissing how we feel, telling us we’re overreacting, or denying there is a problem
      • I still see people trying to downplay the Asian Hate and Violence that came into the spotlight this year

    You avoid:

    • speaking in another language, or with an accent, in public
      • No, I'll speak it. I don't care. But my parents do out of embarrassment
    • using public transport or going to certain public places alone where you could be a minority
      • Nahhhhhh we go where we want in my state (Ohio) but I'll be honest we avoid the Southern States like Alabama, Mississippi, etc.
    • using your real name on a job application
      • My real name isn't typical "Asian" or "Filipino" but my Brother uses his nickname "Eric"
    • worrying about interacting with the police
      • Not in my state but when we were in Arizona a few years ago, we got stopped by police and they asked us for proof of US Citizenship. That was traumatizing and we haven't been back to Arizona since
    • worrying about wearing the clothes we want to wear
      • Nope, I wear what I want.
    • hiding parts of our identity, like our religion or culture
      • My Mom does. I don't.
    • sharing our worldview and taking part in topical discussions
      • I'm very outspoken, but again my parents don't
    • visiting places, or going on holiday to places, where racism has been reported
      • Yes. We avoid certain states in the USA because of this.

    ƒιgнтιηg єνι ву мσσηιgнт~ ωιηηιηg σνє ву αуιgнт~ ( ´ ` ).


  • You may be affected by:

    • racism directed towards your family and loved ones
    • constant negative headlines about a group you identify with or a country you have ties with
    • misrepresentation or no representation in the media
    • noticing worrying patterns of behaviour from the institutions you interact with (whether at your doctor’s surgery, at school, at work)
    • reading statistics that show unfairness and inequality across the justice, health and education system
    • people dismissing how we feel, telling us we’re overreacting, or denying there is a problem

    You avoid:

    • speaking in another language, or with an accent, in public
    • using public transport or going to certain public places alone where you could be a minority
    • using your real name on a job application
    • worrying about interacting with the police
    • worrying about wearing the clothes we want to wear
    • hiding parts of our identity, like our religion or culture
    • sharing our worldview and taking part in topical discussions
    • visiting places, or going on holiday to places, where racism has been reported


    Please go into detail if you want to, I'm really interested in each person's experiences with these things

    Some of them aren't out right racism but I'm still curious

    i worry so much about sharing my cultural clothes, food, and holidays with people outside my family or close friends. i used to wear cultural clothes to picture day at school and everyone would make fun so i wear "normal" clothes or just shirts and pants now.

  • i worry so much about sharing my cultural clothes, food, and holidays with people outside my family or close friends. i used to wear cultural clothes to picture day at school and everyone would make fun so i wear "normal" clothes or just shirts and pants now.

    I think it'd be cool to wear something cultural to school for picture day.....

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