Posts by StCatMouse

    When Gregg Nome was 24 years old, he slipped into the churn beneath a waterfall and began to drown, his body pummelled against the sandy riverbed. What he saw there surprised him.


    Suddenly, his vision filled with crystal-clear scenes from his childhood, events he had mostly forgotten, and then moments from early adulthood. The memories, if that’s what they were, were vivid and crisp. Was he reliving them? Not quite. They came at high speed, almost all at once, in a wave. And yet he could process each one individually. In fact, he was able to perceive everything around him: the rush of the water, the sandy bed, all of it brilliantly distinct. He could “hear and see as never before,” he recalled later. And, despite being trapped underwater, he felt calm and at ease. He remembered thinking that prior to this moment his senses must have been dulled somehow, because only now could he fully understand the world, perhaps even the true meaning of the universe. Eventually, the imagery faded. Next, “There was only darkness,” he said, “and a feeling of a short pause, like something was about to happen.”


    Nome recounted this story at a support group in Connecticut, in 1985, four years after the experience. He had survived, but now he hoped to understand why, during a moment of extreme mortal crisis, his mind had behaved the way it did. The meeting had been organised by Bruce Greyson, now a professor emeritus in psychiatry at the University of Virginia. (Some of the group’s members had responded to an ad Greyson placed in a local newspaper.) As Nome spoke, Greyson sat in a circle of 30 or so others, as if at an AA meeting, listening intently, nodding along.


    Greyson had been hearing of events like these for years. A month into his psychiatric training, in the 1960s, he had been “confronted by a patient who claimed to have left her body” while unconscious on a hospital bed, and who later provided an accurate description of events that had taken place “in a different room”. This made no sense to him. “I was raised in a scientific household,” he says, over Zoom. “My father was a chemist. Growing up, the physical world was all there was.” He felt certain someone had slipped the patient

    the information. He also thought, “What does that even mean, to leave your body?”


    Further reading: The Guardian

    Source: BBC


    The London-born superstar singer also holds the title for the fastest-selling album of all time, for her album 25.


    The announcement was made by The British Phonographic Industry (BPI), the group that looks after the British music industry.


    Some of Adele's musical influences also made the rankings - P!nk came second, followed by Madonna, Rihanna, Dido and Amy Winehouse in sixth.


    Six times Adele has smashed it:


    1. Adele's album '25' became the fastest-selling album of all time, becoming the first album to sell more than three million copies in a week.


    2. Her album '21' is the best-selling album by a female artist in the UK EVER! It sold just under six million copies.


    3. 'Hello' became the first track to be downloaded more than one million times in a week in America. That pushed it straight to the top of the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart, which looks at music sales, streaming and radio play.


    4. Adele managed to pick up an Oscar award in 2013 for her song 'Skyfall', which was the theme tune for the James Bond film.


    5. She has spent a whopping 397 weeks in the UK charts to date.


    6. In 2017 Adele made Grammy award history, by picking up six awards, equalling Beyoncé's record for the most Grammy's won by a female artist in one night.


    Adele was born in Tottenham, North London and around the age of 10 she moved to Brixton in South London, then West Norwood.


    She burst onto the UK music scene in 2007 with her breakthrough song 'Hometown Glory', after attending the selective Brit School for Performing Arts & Technology in Croydon.


    Is Adele going to release a new album?


    Adele's three studio albums have been named after the ages she was when she wrote them - 19, 21 and 25 - and the she recently confirmed she is working on new material.


    This will be her first new album for five years.


    It is not yet known when it will be released, but in February, a video showed the singer performing at a friend's wedding, telling guests: "Expect my album in September."



    Also:


    https://www.music-news.com/new…bum-artist-of-the-century

    https://www.nme.com/news/music…st-of-the-century-2895927

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    I have, and always will prefer Playstation. I'm huge on JRPGs that have only been released on the platform.

    That's one of the few things Microsoft has always struggled, getting Japanese developers to jump into their ecosystem. While a lot of JRPGs now are multi-platform, there is still no close parity between consoles.

    "Make a choice" sounds like something Jigsaw would say.


    Save the closest one unless they are of equal distance then it's the younger kid. Younger people drown faster. There's a slight bit of chance the old woman would be able to hold out longer for me to reach her as well.

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