Does liking Kpop make you less/more racist?

  • Tbh this is something 14-15 year old me would say absolutely to :claps:

    In my case, I was never racist toward Asians but I definitely had a mindset derived from stigma and just hated Kpop because so many people in my life liked it and I'd be sitting there like an idiot not knowing what they were talking about :peperain:

    I'd have to credit SNSD for changing my mindset on entertainment from different countries and BTS for making me proud to like Korean music because I've had so many good conversations about Kpop irl thanks to them that used to get shut out irl before, and they opened a lot of minds to it :borahae:


    I definitely think it can make you more racist, many Kpop fans are closet racists without noticing it :pepe-peek:

    For example, an idol does cultural appropriation and in response to backlash, the fans attack the offended culture

    Or they attack Koreans who are offended by something, eg bullying scandals or drama cancellations these days

    The list goes on, but at the same time it can also do the complete opposite c:


    What do you guys think? ~

  • You can like any genre of music and still be racist because racism is rooted in so many internal and external issues that it won't disappear magically once you start listening to Gee whatsoever.

  • No. It hasn’t made me racist. I accept Asian people in particular Koreans. If I was racist I wouldn’t be following K pop in the first place.

  • I definitely think it can make you more racist, many Kpop fans are closet racists without noticing it :pepe-peek:

    For example, an idol does cultural appropriation and in response to backlash, the fans attack the offended culture

    Or they attack Koreans who are offended by something, eg bullying scandals or drama cancellations these days

    I don't think it can make people more racist. Chances are those people already had racist ideologies before K-pop; it's just that their emotional attachment as a fan brings it out more.

  • I don't think it can make people more racist. Chances are those people already had racist ideologies before K-pop; it's just that their emotional attachment as a fan brings it out more.

    oh uh i dont think korean counts as a race


    in general, those who complain about korea's bad habits do tend to generalize but overall still hold positive views due to being kpop fans


    regardless, kpop absolutely does NOT bring out race neutrality, thats for sure

  • oh uh i dont think korean counts as a race


    in general, those who complain about korea's bad habits do tend to generalize but overall still hold positive views due to being kpop fans


    regardless, kpop absolutely does NOT bring out race neutrality, thats for sure

    You mentioned they're "less racist against Asians/Koreans." I simply responded to that.


    Of course Korean is an ethnicity and Asian is a race. I know that.


    What I'm saying is that people can still have extremely hateful attitudes towards Asians while also liking Asian entertainment, which includes K-pop. These hateful attitudes often exists in the form of passive aggressiveness and negative generalizations.

  • You can like any genre of music and still be racist because racism is rooted in so many internal and external issues that it won't disappear magically once you start listening to Gee whatsoever.

    Agreed. It might only have a shallow effect because of bias toward the artists/idols, but it definitely won't clear up deeply rooted racism because that's something that gets resolved with individual reflection, not songs in a different language.

  • Agreed. It might only have a shallow effect because of bias toward the artists/idols, but it definitely won't clear up deeply rooted racism because that's something that gets resolved with individual reflection, not songs in a different language.

    It's always been like that. I remember watching a video from the 80's where people in London were getting interviewed about Michael Jackson touring in the city and most of them were pretty racist towards the singer, calling him names like "Wacko Jacko", although they were still "fans" of his music.


    Also black Jazz musicians back in the 1940s ~ 1950s were massively popular among white people and you already know what they thought of black people. So yeah, liking Kpop will make you more open minded to a different language at best and that's pretty much it.

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