Companies shouldn't debut minors anymore

  • Being a kpop idol is a very difficult job even for an adult. I've seen countless articles of idols saying they have hectic schedules and some idols even developing anxiety due to being overworked like Mina from Twice. Could you imagine being a teenager having to balance going to school with all of your difficult schedules as an idol? You may have to drop out of school which means you miss out on education that may actually be important for the long run. Also, you may be seperated from your parents at a young age when it's better for kids to have the guidance from their parents until they're at least 18.


    You pile that up with the weirdos who may s*xualise you despite you being a minor and who knows how far they'll go with that. It seems a very tedious for companies to continue debuting children who should enjoy being a child and attend school instead of overworking themselves and getting s*xualised.



    What do you guys think?



  • Kpop companies want idols to relate to younger fans, they also want their idol group to last as long as they can, so debuting young idols will make them have a longer career. It's really wrong tbh but companies have been debuted minors since 1st gen, I mean BOA literally debuted at 13, so I don't see it stopping anytime soon.

  • I think this is simply common sense, but companies wanna perfect their idols and keep them profitable for a long time, so having a young idol that is successful=having a cash cow for a long time. These companies dont give a shit about their idols mental state imo they just want money

  • I agree with all your points.


    These children are underdeveloped physically & mentally, and I don't humanely see how they could handle all the pressure they're given. Children are also very naive at that age, so whatever the company tells them to do, they'll trust them 100%, even if they're being sexually harrassed behind the scenes. The youngest idols should debut, should be age 16. Around that age, people know better and have a better understanding of what's safe and what's off-limits.

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  • Its just like saying minors shouldnt act either.


    Not fair to the minors. Boa debuted at 15 and was very successful. Same with Yeri and Tzuyu.

    So what are you saying? I'm not being fair to the minors who were successful? I'm totally being fair, because all of those idols you mentioned have been through shit... as minors.


    Tzuyu was s*xualised when she was 16 in an video of herself dancing inappropriately in an elevator. Yeri faced a lot of hate after joining Red Velvet and it must've been hard for someone at her age. And Boa didn't debut at 15, she debuted at 13 which is younger.

  • I think this is simply common sense, but companies wanna perfect their idols and keep them profitable for a long time, so having a young idol that is successful=having a cash cow for a long time. These companies dont give a shit about their idols mental state imo they just want money

    There's a solution here.. debut them when they are fresh off turning 18 and keep them for a long time and debut them solo after a few years.

  • Yes I agree. It is too mentally and physically taxing on them & force them to grow up too fast. Imagine dealing with puberty and having to diet all the time too... It can't be healthy for them. A lot of them probably don't have the courage to speak out if they feel they are being treated unfairly and being subjected to hate at that age is just awful. Companies are debuting people as young as 14 /15 yr old just does not sit right with me. Wonyoung from Iz*one for example ...She performed side to side in produce48 when she was just 14. A song with sexual lyrics, a provocative dance and inappropriate clothes.



  • i agree. being a kpop idol is so stressful, even for adults. plus teens receiving hate comments (which they're going to get no matter what, ppl love to hate on idols) could do major damage to their mental health. imagine some underage girl having her appearance scrutinized to the last detail by netizens. if even idols like jimin park have suffered from insecurity about their appearance, then a teenager being exposed to that would be so detrimental to them.


    plus, just as bad, if not worse, they will have to deal with perverts sexualising them at their young age.


    at that stage, they should just be training (and treated well, not worked like robots), and not thrust out yet to receive the world's judgement.

  • Kpop companies want idols to relate to younger fans, they also want their idol group to last as long as they can, so debuting young idols will make them have a longer career. It's really wrong tbh but companies have been debuted minors since 1st gen, I mean BOA literally debuted at 13, so I don't see it stopping anytime soon.

    Good point but I beg to differ based on the fact that companies should just debut idols at 18 and keep them as long as they can and debut them solo if they need to.

  • i agree. being a kpop idol is so stressful, even for adults. plus teens receiving hate comments (which they're going to get no matter what, ppl love to hate on idols) could do major damage to their mental health. imagine some underage girl having her appearance scrutinized to the last detail by netizens. if even idols like jimin park have suffered from insecurity about their appearance, then a teenager being exposed to that would be so detrimental to them.


    plus, just as bad, if not worse, they will have to deal with perverts sexualising them at their young age.


    at that stage, they should just be training (and treated well, not worked like robots), and not thrust out yet to receive the world's judgement.

    This!!!! :pepe-toast:


    You put it better than I did. Children should enjoy being kids instead of having to worry about hate comments and creeps s*xualising them. They aren't meant to be exposed to the real world until they're 18 but by debuting them, you're doing just that.

  • If the idols in question were all attending liberal arts schools, it would be easier to balance the different, important aspects of life. Unfortunately, this isn't the reality for many idols. If companies could commit to owning educational institutions that provided flexibility to keep up with both musical training and high school, I don't think it would be too serious. But this would be costly and I don't think the majority would choose to participate.


    Forcing sexual themes on minors is a horrible problem, but I don't think that forbidding young people from pursuing their dreams is the best choice in trying to stop it. I don't know oh-so-much when it comes to marketing in entertainment, but I have heard that production teams will consider harmful/offensive content and whether it should be included within the final product. Whether the offensive material makes its way through is a matter of whether the culture that's primarily consuming it will put up with it, so I think that it boils down to South Korean society's behavior towards feminism and child rights.


    The lives of K-Pop idols often remind me of the (female) Olympic athletes who were famous during the 70s, 80s, and 90s. These girls started training much earlier of course, but I think their schedules in their adolescent years, as well as the stress associated with dieting and public approval are quite similar. Names like Nadia Comaneci, Elena Mukhina, and Dominique Moceanu come to mind especially.

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  • It's hard for them to change it. Everyone becomes a trainee when they are minor and the company just debuts them when they think the trainee could make a profit for them. Most companies will refer to the world music industry, the idea of debuting minor is influenced by western celeb early age of debut. It so sad that no company will wait for them to at least reach 18 years old before debuting them.

  • So what are you saying? I'm not being fair to the minors who were successful? I'm totally being fair, because all of those idols you mentioned have been through shit... as minors.


    Tzuyu was s*xualised when she was 16 in an video of herself dancing inappropriately in an elevator. Yeri faced a lot of hate after joining Red Velvet and it must've been hard for someone at her age. And Boa didn't debut at 15, she debuted at 13 which is younger.

    Tzuyu and Yeri are also likely millionaires and set for life, and so are all their families.. not fair to rob minors of their goals, they might not achieve those if they dont take them right away.

  • Tzuyu and Yeri are also likely millionaires and set for life, and so are all their families.. not fair to rob minors of their goals, they might not achieve those if they dont take them right away.

    How am I robbing minors of their goals?


    No matter how many goals a minor achieves, that doesn't take away from the negative things that have affected them such as s*xualisation, hate comments, and exhaustion. Those things aren't jokes and can outweigh the goals sometimes. Mina is in the same group as Tzuyu and is also a millionaire and set for life. Heck, her family was rich even before she debuted. Yet, she still went through anxiety because she was overworked by JYP and possibly hate comments also. Being rich and famous doesn't mean you are automatically happy..


    It's 2021, you should know this.

  • I agree. For these idols' well-being, it's better that they take more time to experience life with their families and friends before going into stardom.


    I know this is just one example, but it's one that many can recognize:


    I watched Blackpink's Light Up the Sky documentary. What I learned and observed is that Jisoo seems to be the most emotionally strong one because she had more time to spend with family and friends, more of a normal life, before fame.


    I'm not saying this to diss the other members; it's not their fault they got into the business at a younger age. I'm just saying they had less time as normal teenagers and young adults, so it's more difficult for them to deal with the fact that they sacrificed that part of their life. It's an emotional thing.


    Yes, I know they debuted as adults, not minors, but just think about how much more challenging it would be for idols who debuted as minors.

  • How am I robbing minors of their goals?


    No matter how many goals a minor achieves, that doesn't take away from the negative things that have affected them such as s*xualisation, hate comments, and exhaustion. Those things aren't jokes and can outweigh the goals sometimes. Mina is in the same group as Tzuyu and is also a millionaire and set for life. Heck, her family was rich even before she debuted. Yet, she still went through anxiety because she was overworked by JYP and possibly hate comments also. Being rich and famous doesn't mean you are automatically happy..


    It's 2021, you should know this.

    I have to agree with you on this.


    From a fan's perspective, it's easy to look at idols and assume they have no reason to be upset, but there's a whole lot in life that money can't replace.


    People often underestimate it, but those teenage years (or even early twenties) are a truly important time in life that should be spent doing normal, everyday things, such as spending time with friends and family. Without that, people often feel like they're missing something, but can't quite figure out what.


    I'd rather idols (and to an extent, trainees) start their careers later so they can be truly happy.

  • Yeah I agree with you 100%. Kpop does sexualize their idols. Both from the fans' side and companies' side, and it sucks that minors have to go through that especially. Putting them in the industry is putting them at risk. Not saying adult idols should have to deal with that either because they shouldn't, but I do feel like as an adult they can have a better understanding and maturity to deal with that and of course make decisions regarding that.


    I know that the American entertainment industry isn't 100% a 1 on 1 comparison to the Korean entertainment industry, but we've all seen child stars grow up to have all kinds of issues. I'm sure it's the same for Korean idols as well. Mental health care in Korea can be tough sometimes because of all the pressures and I do feel like putting minors in the limelight like that does put more pressure and make coping more difficult.

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